Consumer Debt Advocate – Consolidate Your Unsecured Debts

Many people are now desperate to find a solution to their scary collection of debts that are far bigger than the owners could ever hope to repay without help. Fortunately after the financial crisis of the last few years, such help is now readily available. One company that assists individuals stricken by their debts is Consumer Debt Advocate.

The Consumer Debt Advocate company prides itself on its ability to help individuals settle their debts that are not secured for from just forty to sixty cents on every dollar owed. The exact amount actually varies with the applicant’s particular scenario and difficulties. Although the dollar amount of bills is different for every individual, the company’s programs will allow a person to consolidate all of his or her bills into one debt consolidating payment so that the total bills can be eliminated in only one to three years time usually. Whether this process requires less than a year, or even longer than three years, they promise to stay by the debtor’s side all the way until the last bill is settled.

The debt counselors working for Consumer Debt Advocate have successfully assisted hundreds of different individuals in reducing their bills to a manageable level in the last four years of time. The first monthly payment that is required in the consolidating process saves the client money to help reduce the pressure of the bills’ stifling minimum payments. The company is proud of the fact that they talk honestly and openly with the prospective customers regarding the advantages and disadvantages of their settling debts program in order for the person to be sure that this decision is the best one for his or her individual case. They also take pride in offering the most reasonable costs for their services in the business, passing the savings along to the customers. They stick to the best standards of ethics in the credit consolidating and settlement industries.

One thing that Consumer Debt Advocate is very free about is the sometimes confusing difference between the debt elimination that they practice and the debt consolidating that other not for profit organizations offer. In their program of debt reduction, balances that must be repaid are drastically cut back. With debt consolidating, the full payments are paid back at a lower interest rate.

There are many advantages to the program that this company offers. They do not charge for enrollment, which is unusual. They promise to lower the clients’ monthly payments. Besides this, they ensure that their customers are relieved from their debt faster.

Fixed vs Adjustable Rates

Apples vs. oranges. Boxers vs. briefs. Dave Letterman vs. Jay Leno. These debates may rage on for decades, and we can add another one to the list: fixed vs. adjustable. We’re speaking, of course, of fixed rate and adjustable rate mortgages.

Let’s start the discussion by talking about risk. If I had to pick one word that explained the mortgage industry, it would be risk. If you can understand the concept of risk and how it relates to mortgages, you’re way ahead of the game. In a nutshell, riskier loans mean higher interest rates; you compensate the person lending you money by paying them a higher interest rate. If you have low FICO scores, this is a higher risk to the investor since you don’t have a good history of paying your bills on time, so you’re going to have to pay a higher rate. If you can’t verify enough income to qualify for the loan, this is a higher risk and you’re going to have to pay a higher interest rate.

As it relates to this discussion, the longer you ask the lender to guarantee your interest rate, the higher risk for them since they’re guaranteeing the rate you get but they don’t know how much their funds are going to cost them going forward. This isn’t an easy concept to wrap your mind around, so don’t feel bad if you don’t get it yet. Lenders work on a concept called arbitrage, which is a fancy way of saying they borrow money at a certain rate and then lend it out to you. However, lenders don’t get money at 30-year fixed rates, so when they borrow money they have to try to gauge what it’s going to cost them over the time they lend it to you. If you’re following me so far, you can understand why they would charge a higher rate to guarantee you a certain rate for 30 years as opposed to 3 or 5 years. Now, on to our discussion…

On the one hand, we have fixed rate advocates. These days, this is a relatively easy argument to make since rates are at 40-year lows. The main reason to get a fixed-rate mortgage, whether it be a 15-, 20-, or 30-year fixed, is to protect yourself from adjustable interest rates. When you get a fixed rate loan, you know exactly what your payments are going to be and they’re not going to change for the life of the loan. In a time when rates are rising, a fixed rate mortgage gives you the security of knowing that you’re safe.

On the other hand, there are the adjustable rate advocates. The main argument here, in a nutshell, is that you shouldn’t pay for something you don’t need. A great majority of people out there will only keep their mortgage for 3-5 years. Maybe it’s a job change, maybe it’s an expanding or contracting family, a refinance for home improvements or college for the kids, or any number of life circumstances. Since you’re probably not going to keep your mortgage for 15 or 30 years, you’re probably better off to get a lower adjustable rate mortgage and pocket the difference.

I’m not going to say one argument is better than the other. There’s no such thing as a “good” or “bad” loan, but there are loans that are better or worse for certain people. In my career as a mortgage consultant, I can tell you that I’ve done very few fixed rate loans. I only recommend them in two cases – when people are on a fixed income and need to know exactly what to expect from their mortgage, or when people are absolutely sure that they’re not going to move or need to refinance for many, many years. In a great majority of cases, people don’t need a fixed rate loan and would in fact be much better off with a loan that accomplishes their goals and saves them money in the long term. Like oranges vs. apples or Letterman vs. Leno, fixed vs. adjustable is not a debate that can be definitively settled, but I hope I’ve helped you figure out which one may be right for you.

To Rate Doctors Can Be a Huge Help

Rating professionals is not a new concept for web sites. Most college students are familiar with rate your professor web sites that let them rate and review their professors. And thanks to consumer driven web sites, consumers are already familiar with rating their contractors, dry cleaners and other professionals hired for a job. But, now there are web sites that allow consumers to rate doctors.

Rating doctors however is not quite the same as rating other professionals, as many doctors who oppose the web site concept have pointed out. For one thing, if you don’t like your dry cleaner or contractor, and post a poor review of their services, it is fairly straight forward to assess blame. Your contractor, for example, can reply to your post and review about their performance, and give the public their version of events. The doctor, on the other hand, is bound by privacy laws and there fourth doesn’t have the luxury of a posting a public reply.

This situation has the potential to create postings that rate doctors as slightly one sided. To counter this side effect the more reputable web sites won’t post any anonymous postings, so any patient who chooses this public forum to rate doctors, does so with their name also attached. But despite these safeguards, a patient can choose to leave out information or exaggerate information to suite their rating, even if they don’t do it intentionally.

Advocates, who favor the rating system, argue that these web sites, allow patients to have a voice and be heard in the medical world. The medical world, as patient advocates point out, can be an intimidating system to navigate.

Some could argue the point that having a web site that allows patients to rate doctors levels the playing field and gives both sides some power and a voice. Doctors after all have been used to having the final say and having all of the power in these relationships. It has only been lately with the help of the internet that patients have been able to surf the web and get some insight into their own medical condition, tipping the sense of power into balance.

Still, despite the pros and cons of a system that can rate doctors as easily as it can rate your contractor, it is doubtful that these web sites will disappear or loose their ability to alter perceptions. However, patients who post reviews should strive to be accurate, factual and honest and consumers who read the reviews for guidance should be careful to not dismiss a doctor based on one bad review, bearing in mind that not all of the facts are being laid out from just one person’s perspective.